Six local payments methods merchants in MENA should know about

Payments

3 min read

Local payment methods are becoming increasingly popular as consumers in the Middle East and North Africa pivot away from cash. But what local payment methods should merchants offer? 

Top of any business strategy must be an understanding of how consumers want to pay. Offering a payment method that people like can make the difference between a sale won, or lost. 

But knowledge at the category level — card, digital wallet, bank transfer — will get merchants only so far. Those categories are increasingly congested by different solutions. Customer-centric merchants will want to understand each payment category in its own right. When they do, customer preference will not be the only factor of interest. The coverage, cost, success rate and speed of remittance of each solution should also come into the equation.

So too, your ambition for segmenting your market. The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) is an enormous region — between 20 to 30 countries, depending on your definition. They include many of the wealthy OPEC nations; those with strong European ties, such as Israel and Turkey; through to countries synonymous with conflict and instability. A single payment strategy to cover the region will be too riddled with compromises. Yet, there comes a point when granularity becomes uneconomical. Merchants must decide on the right balance for them. 

Local payment methods are likely to be in the mix. Increasingly these are replacing globally recognized card networks and cash across the region. Here are six of the most popular local payment methods that merchants operating across MENA must offer to increase customer acquisition and loyalty. 

Six local payment in MENA you need to offer your customers

Type: Digital wallet

Main country: Bahrain

What you need to know: BenefitPay is a mobile app that lets consumers make online payments via QR codes.

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Name: Fawry 

Type: Cash/voucher

Main country: Egypt 

What you need to know: Fawry lets Egyptian consumers pay for online purchases in cash at more than 194,500 locations in 300 cities across Egypt.  

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Name: Knet

Type: Local card scheme 

Main country: Kuwait 

What you need to know: Knet lets merchants accept all local debit cards issued by the 11 member banks of Kuwait. It accounts for 80% of the country’s online transactions.

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Name: OmanNet

Type: Local card scheme 

Main country: Oman

What you need to know: OmanNet routes debit card payments within Oman and GCCNET countries. It covers all debit cards issued by local banks in Oman, which account for approximately 90% of payment cards in the country. 

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Name: QPAY

Type: Digital card

Main country: Qatar

What you need to know: QPAY debit cards are issued by local banks and used by consumers to make online payments. The cardholder's identity is verified using a one-time passcode sent to their mobile phone via SMS.

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Name: mada

Type: Debit card

Main country: Saudi Arabia

What you need to know: mada is a debit card issued by local banks in Saudi Arabia. It can be used to make payments online or at over 160,000 POS terminals in the Kingdom, and millions more internationally through the Visa, MasterCard, and Maestro networks. 30m mada cards are in circulation.

Local insights vs. scalability

Even merchants familiar with the region can struggle to keep pace with the emergence of new local payment methods. For international brands just starting to target these markets, it can feel like being dropped in the middle of a maze without a map. Acquiring, and maintaining, this knowledge will suck resources and budget. Yet the alternative  — a generic, one size fits all payment strategy — is bound to fall short. So which approach to choose?

Shrewd merchants see the false dichotomy of this thinking. Instead, they leverage payment partners that can provide the technical infrastructure, and crucially the local knowledge too. The latter is about offering people their preferred payment choice; the former is about being able to make that happen. Some PSPs will have local knowledge, but without the full apparatus to action what’s best. Others will have the scale but not the local insights to apply it most effectively. Merchants with ambitions in the region should prioritize working with a PSP that can give them it all. 

Want to know how the region's leading merchants are leveraging local payment methods to drive sales and maximize revenue? Check out our set of exclusive merchant interviews.

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Written on Dec 13, 2020 by

Emilie Gauthier

Product Marketing Manager, Checkout.com

Keep up-to-date with all things payments

We process your personal data in accordance with Checkout.com's privacy policy. By subscribing, you consent to us sharing updates with you.

Keep up-to-date with all things payments

The Checkout.com team

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